Recent Blog Posts

Matthew Hannah's picture
Authored by Matthew Hannah

Beginning in that annus mirabilis of modern literature, 1922, and petering out in 1950, the letters between novelist E. M. Forster and the Hogarth Press provide a fascinating and extended glimpse of the relationship between one of England’s best novelists and his publishing agents. This trove of letters features discussions about the technical particulars of paper color and type, of distribution and copyright, but they also hint at personal details of the correspondents, most notably between Leonard Woolf and Forster, or “Morgan” as he’s addressed. Although most of the letters sent during this 28-year period focus on publishing and distribution, small details about the relationship between the two men peek through the negotiations and discussions about Forster’s book Pharos and Pharillon, published by Hogarth Press in May 1923. Both aspects of this collection are fascinating for scholars and students of modern publishing and literature.

Alice Staveley's picture
Authored by Alice Staveley

At MAPP, we invest a lot of intense, purposeful, and rewarding group effort thinking about how literary theory and digital methodology interact in the context of shifting disciplinary pressures within modernist studies and academic humanities in general. We are always asking ourselves how archival theory and digital praxis reinforce one another, while remaining attentive to and engaging the productive tension between theory and praxis in the actual making of MAPP.   

Check out this excellent recent article by Matt Huculak about these very issues, which explores how digital modernist projects have “reenergized the field.” MAPP gets a favorable mention, and the Hogarth Press door plate—portal and threshold to our own digital edifice—a pleasing show. Enjoy!

Alice Staveley's picture
Authored by Alice Staveley

We were recently excited to learn that Harvard University has put online one complete volume of the six photographic family albums of Virginia Woolf now housed at Harvard’s Houghton Library. This beautifully ‘flippable’ complete album was blogged about on Open Culture; you can view it in full here.

Peter Morgan's picture
Authored by Peter Morgan

 

The hand must have trembled. The regular dip of the capital J turned slightly, yet noticeably, to the left as if by some interruption. I had no idea what might have startled the writer, but my mind took to creatively filling the gaps. A mother of three, she must have been deprived of sleep by a particularly late night reading to the kids about the professional horse races she had loved as a child; startled by the sudden entrance of the Welsh bagman, her pen had slipped creating, for my post-millennial eyes, that lopsided enigmatic “J”.

Nicola Wilson's picture
Authored by Nicola Wilson

Author Biographies and Publisher Descriptions 

We are seeking submissions for biographical entries for the authors, artists and workers of The Hogarth Press, and for MAPP's publishing house descriptions pages.  MAPP is the first modernist DH project to focus exclusively on twentieth-century publishing houses.  It offers a pioneering digital platform to organize, interact with, and analyze book production, reception, and distribution networks and will represent a replicable digital model for contemporary and future scholars of modernist publishing and book culture. 

We are also open to student work and to pedagogical uses of MAPP. Please contact our team to discuss possible pedagogical collaborations and student writing: http://www.modernistarchives.com/contact

Submission Guidelines

Victoria Ding's picture
Authored by Victoria Ding

The task of transcribing order books from the Hogarth Press sounded straightforward enough to me. I typed out the first few rows of Vita Sackville-West’s All Passion Spent from left to right: date, cumulative total copies sold, markings (such as check marks), purchaser name, code / notes (such as LL), number of copies ordered, date order received, date order filled, and price (in pounds, shillings, and pence). I took time with these first few entries, making sure I captured every detail. As I continued, I became more curious about the materials I was working with. Who was Deighton Bell and why did he buy so many copies, just to return one of them? Why were Menzies and Hockliffe charged different amounts for the same number of copies? In my head, these mysterious buyers started to come to life. Transcription became less of a manual chore; it became a quest to uncover the framework of the Hogarth Press.

Michael Widner's picture
Authored by Michael Widner

This post will provide a few excerpts from the chapter "Building a Critical Digital Archive" from our collectively-authored book Scholarly Adventures in the Digital Humanities. This post is intended as a introduction to understanding the distinctions among different objects found on this site. For the full description and rationale, please refer to our book.

Nicola Wilson's picture
Authored by Nicola Wilson

Some Hogarth Press Centenary events coming up:

Celebrating the Hogarth Press: "A Press of One's Own," Wednesday, 10 May, Houghton Library and Bow & Arrow Press (Harvard)

https://hogarthpress100.wordpress.com/ Co-chairs, Modernism Seminar: Sam Alexander, Paige Reynolds, & J. P. Riquelme

 

Oxford Bodleian, Print-a-thon, May 13th

Nicola Wilson's picture
Authored by Nicola Wilson

As part of the centenary celebrations of the Hogarth Press taking place around the Annual Virginia Woolf conference at the University of Reading this year, we are inviting letterpress artists and printers to submit works on paper relating to the broad theme of ‘Virginia Woolf and the Hogarth Press At 100’.

Works may respond to a variety of themes including:

– hand-press and letterpress work in the first machine-age

– publishing in wartime

– art as therapy

– women’s writing

– modernist printing

– the author as publisher

– the book arts and aesthetics of the Hogarth Press

Deadline 5 May 2017.

Single sheet works may be submitted on any sized paper.

Artist’s name and any contributing designers, imprint, the location of press and other printing details may be included on the print.

Alice Staveley's picture
Authored by Alice Staveley

You might wonder what these three names have in common.  For MAPP, quite a lot. It was widely reported last fall that Sarah Jessica Parker, former star of the HBO hit Sex in the City, and now widely known by her initials SJP, has been commissioned an editorial director of an eponymous series within the Hogarth imprint. Random House resurrected The Hogarth Press imprint in 2012 in homage to the Woolfs’ publishing house.

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