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Victoria Ding's picture
Authored by Victoria Ding

The task of transcribing order books from the Hogarth Press sounded straightforward enough to me. I typed out the first few rows of Vita Sackville-West’s All Passion Spent from left to right: date, cumulative total copies sold, markings (such as check marks), purchaser name, code / notes (such as LL), number of copies ordered, date order received, date order filled, and price (in pounds, shillings, and pence). I took time with these first few entries, making sure I captured every detail. As I continued, I became more curious about the materials I was working with. Who was Deighton Bell and why did he buy so many copies, just to return one of them? Why were Menzies and Hockliffe charged different amounts for the same number of copies? In my head, these mysterious buyers started to come to life. Transcription became less of a manual chore; it became a quest to uncover the framework of the Hogarth Press.

Michael Widner's picture
Authored by Michael Widner

This post will provide a few excerpts from the chapter "Building a Critical Digital Archive" from our collectively-authored book Scholarly Adventures in the Digital Humanities. This post is intended as a introduction to understanding the distinctions among different objects found on this site. For the full description and rationale, please refer to our book.

Nicola Wilson's picture
Authored by Nicola Wilson

Some Hogarth Press Centenary events coming up:

Celebrating the Hogarth Press: "A Press of One's Own," Wednesday, 10 May, Houghton Library and Bow & Arrow Press (Harvard)

https://hogarthpress100.wordpress.com/ Co-chairs, Modernism Seminar: Sam Alexander, Paige Reynolds, & J. P. Riquelme

 

Oxford Bodleian, Print-a-thon, May 13th

Nicola Wilson's picture
Authored by Nicola Wilson

As part of the centenary celebrations of the Hogarth Press taking place around the Annual Virginia Woolf conference at the University of Reading this year, we are inviting letterpress artists and printers to submit works on paper relating to the broad theme of ‘Virginia Woolf and the Hogarth Press At 100’.

Works may respond to a variety of themes including:

– hand-press and letterpress work in the first machine-age

– publishing in wartime

– art as therapy

– women’s writing

– modernist printing

– the author as publisher

– the book arts and aesthetics of the Hogarth Press

Deadline 5 May 2017.

Single sheet works may be submitted on any sized paper.

Artist’s name and any contributing designers, imprint, the location of press and other printing details may be included on the print.

Alice Staveley's picture
Authored by Alice Staveley

You might wonder what these three names have in common.  For MAPP, quite a lot. It was widely reported last fall that Sarah Jessica Parker, former star of the HBO hit Sex in the City, and now widely known by her initials SJP, has been commissioned an editorial director of an eponymous series within the Hogarth imprint. Random House resurrected The Hogarth Press imprint in 2012 in homage to the Woolfs’ publishing house.

Nicola Wilson's picture
Authored by Nicola Wilson

We are looking forward to hosting the Annual Virginia Woolf conference at Reading this summer, 29 June- 2 July. www.woolf2017.com

In additon to launching the first phase of MAPP, there will be contributions from Cassandra Laity and the new Feminist Modernist Studies journal (Routledge Press, launching later this year), Nicola Beauman of Persephone Books, Uzma Hameed (dramaturg of Wayne's McGregor's ballet Woolf Works), Professor Ted Bishop of the University of Alberta, Professor Susheila Nasta MBE, and Professor Anna Snaith. In the centenary year of the Hogarth Press, we are also organising a roundtable of publishers and booksellers to address issues around feminist and independent publishing today. There will be an exhibition of materials relating to the Hogarth Press, including contemporary artworks, running at Reading's Special Collections between June and September.

Call for Papers:

Nicola Wilson's picture
Authored by Nicola Wilson

While we have been working away on the final stages of our collaborative book project, Scholarly Adventures in Digital Humanities: Making the Modernist Archives Publishing Project (forthcoming as a short Palgrave Pivot title), the Hogarth Press has had its 99th birthday! Thanks to Rhys Tranter for posting http://rhystranter.com/2016/03/23/hogarth-press-founded-23-march-1917/ 

Elizabeth Willson Gordon's picture
Authored by Elizabeth Willson Gordon

 

This blog post is part of a conversation between Jacky den Haan and Brixton Sandhals about how our personalities dictate how each of us went about writing biographies on Modernist writers.

At the first April meeting for King’s University MAPP RAs, I received the task of writing the biographies of Fyodor Dostoevsky and D. H. Lawrence. Dostoevsky is a 19th-century Russian writer, but a translation of several of his works, entitled Stavrogin’s Confessions and The Plan of the Life of of a Great Sinner, was published by the Hogarth Press in 1922. D.H. Lawrence similarly worked in translation, and worked with S. S. Koteliansky to translate “The Gentleman from San Fransisco”by I.A. Bunin, published in a larger collection of Bunin’s works by the Hogarth Press in 1922.

Elizabeth Willson Gordon's picture
Authored by Elizabeth Willson Gordon

Sara Barnard

Tall dusty bookshelves, softly silent rooms and row after row of slightly tattered, well-loved books- as a child, this was my image of paradise. And it still is. There is something inexplicably powerful about the image of the book; that (generally) small collection of marked papers, often stored on the sideline of everyday life and yet containing the power to transform the world. This image combined with that of the writer who often stands seemingly still on the edges of society with a lack of that glitter which draws the eye of the world, and yet still molding, still shaping and moving that world with their ideas, their passions, their words, is one that has captured my imagination since I was very small. So heading into the MAPP project, I have been constantly overwhelmed and grateful for every bit of the experience.

 

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